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Island Ice Skating at Windward Mall

  • Wednesday, Jan. 25 12:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
  • Windward Mall
  • 46-056 Kamehameha Hwy Kaneohe, HI

Windward Mall welcomes Mike Inc.’s synthetic skating rink into the former Border’s retail space to bring winter to Hawaii without the cold weather. The synthetic rink will allow shoppers to enjoy the winter-like experience of ice-skating without having to bundle up or travel to the mainland.

When:
January 9, 2012 through January 26, 2012
Monday – Friday: 2:00 p.m to 9:00 PM
Saturdays: 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM
Sundays: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

25th Annual April Foolish ‘Fun’raiser to benefit Make-A-Wish Hawaii

  • Saturday, April 9 12:00 a.m.
  • The Waterfront at Aloha Tower Marketplace
  • 1 Aloha Tower Dr. Honolulu, HI

• Two Live Rockin’ Bands: Hoopla & Wet!!!
• Silent Auction 5-8 PM
• Heavy Pupus early in the evening
• Dancing
• Great door prizes including neighbor
island getaways courtesy of Castle Resorts & Hotels
•Free Drink!

All net proceeds will be donated to Make-A-Wish Hawaii.

Tickets: $25 in advance and $30 at the door

To purchase tickets, call Make-A-Wish Hawaii at (808) 537-3118. Credit cards accepted.

Check out our facebook event at http://on.fb.me/h51b3n

TSSOC Presents: SHOGUN – Island Paintball

  • Sunday, Jan. 23 12:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
  • Island Paintball
  • Bellows Air Force Station, Tinker Road Waimanolo, HI

TSSOC Presents: SHOGUN – Jan 22-23 2011- Island Paintball, Oahu, HAWAII

Tri-State Special Operations Command scenario paintball team, partnered with Island Paintball on Oahu, Hawaii, is pleased to announce our upcoming production of Shogun – A Scenario Paintball Game, on Saturday, January 22nd and 23rd, 2011.

Pre-Registration Entry will be $55, Day of Registration will be $60, which includes CO2/HPA.

Paint will be $55, $60 and $65 per case, field paint only.

For more information, visit www.tristatespecops.com

Aloha Nights, block party presented by DFS Galleria Waikiki

  • Monday, Jan. 3 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
  • Kalakaua Avenue between Royal Hawaiian and Lewers Streets.
  • Honolulu, HI

Aloha Nights, block party presented by DFS Galleria Waikiki, with food booths from some of Hawaii’s best restaurants such as Alan Wong’s, Nobu’s, Roy’s Waikiki, The Beachhouse at the Moana, Wolfgang’s Steakhouse, Kai Market at the Sheraton Waikiki, Chai’s Island Bistro, Azure at the Royal Hawaiian, Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin, and beverages from Waialua Soda Works and entertainment by Jake Shimabukuro, 7-8 PM; Keola Beamer and Raiatea, 8-9 PM; and renowned Japanese beauty expert and TV personality IKKO from 9-10 PM, 7-10 PM Jan. 3, 2011, Kalakaua Avenue between Royal Hawaiian and Lewers Streets. Free. 931-2700

The climate of Hawaii


The climate of Hawaii is atypical for a tropical area, and is regarded as more subtropical than the latitude would suggest, because of the moderating effect of the surrounding ocean. Temperatures and humidity tend to be less extreme, with summer high temperatures seldom reaching above the upper 80s (°F) and winter temperatures (at low elevation) seldom dipping below the mid-60s. Snow, although not usually associated with tropics, falls at high elevations on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island in some winter months. Snow only rarely falls on Maui’s Haleakala.

Local climates vary considerably on each island, grossly divisible into windward (koolau) and leeward (ewa) areas based upon location relative to the higher mountains. Windward sides face the Northeast Trades and receive much more rainfall; leeward sides are drier, with less rain and less cloud cover. This fact is utilized by the tourist industry, which concentrates resorts on sunny leeward coasts.

Mahalo

Mahalo for wanting to learn Hawaiian. Please check your email everyday for a new Hawaiian word or phrase.

Merchants here in Hawaii help to support this site and make things like language lessons possible. Beside the word or phrase you learn today. You will also might receive a special offer from a local merchant.

You can lets us know on which island you will be visiting and we will try to make local offers there available for you.

You can unsubscribe at any time. Via one of the emails you receive. We hope you enjoy your stay in the Aloha state.

Formed by volcanoes


All of the Hawaiian Islands were formed by volcanoes arising from the sea floor through a vent described in geological theory as a hotspot. The theory maintains that as the tectonic plate beneath much of the Pacific Ocean moves in a northwesterly direction, the hot spot remains stationary, slowly creating new volcanoes. This explains why only volcanoes on the southern half of the Island of Hawaii are presently active.

The last volcanic eruption outside the Island of Hawaii happened at Haleakala on Maui in the late 18th century. The newest volcano to form is Loihi, deep below the waters off the southern coast of the Island of Hawaii.

The islands are the farthest removed from any other body of land in the world. The isolation of the Hawaiian Islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, and the wide range of environments to be found on high islands located in and near the tropics, has resulted in a vast array of endemic flora and fauna, with a considerable number found exclusively in Hawaii or the surrounding ocean. Because of the islands’ volcanic formation, native life before human activity is said to have arrived by the “3 W’s”: wind, waves, and wings. The volcanic activity and subsequent erosion created impressive geological features.

Hawaii is notable for rainfall: Mount Waialeale, on the island of Kauai, has the second highest average annual rainfall on earth: about 460 inches (11.7 m). The Big Island of Hawaii is notable as the world’s fifth highest island. If the height of the island is measured from its base, deep in the ocean, to its snow-clad peak on Mauna Kea, it can be considered one of the tallest mountains in the world.