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2 Point 0

  • Sunday, April 15 12:00 a.m.
  • Chart House Waikiki
  • 1765 Ala Moana Blvd. Honolulu, Hawaii

2 Point 0 (Tito Berinobis & Billy Beimes): Contemporary. 8 PM to midnight at Chart House, 941-6660.

Soulgasm by Housing Project 360

  • Monday, Dec. 5 12:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m.
  • thirtyninehotel
  • 39 N Hotel St Honolulu, HI

Housing Project 360 presents Soulgasm every 3rd Friday. Transport yourself to the house scene of New York City as we bring you deep underground house with a twist of funk and soul. Extending from the famous Soulgasm NYC party, we strive to recreate the environment of freedom, acceptance, and self-expressive dance through house music. David Macuso’s legendary analog sound system guarantees full audio stimuli as DJs HughB, Kentaro, Matt Kee, and Yuji takes you on their musical journey.

House of Blue Leaves

  • Friday, Nov. 18 12:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Paul and Vi Loo Theatre
  • 45-045 Kamehameha Highway Kaneohe, HI

Set in Sunnyside, Queens, on that day in 1965 when Pope Paul VI visited New York, John Guare’s early, breakthrough play features mockingly observed nuns, a lethal (but farcical) political bombing, a G.I. earmarked for Vietnam and, as a protagonist, a zookeeper who dreams in vain of making it big in Hollywood as a songwriter.
7:30pm
DATES: Thursday-Sunday November 10 11,12,13
Thursday – Sunday November 17,18,19,20
Wednesday November 23
Friday – Sunday November 25, 26*, 27
8pm December 1,2, 3* ,4

Hawaiian territory


When William McKinley won the presidential election in November of 1896, the question of Hawaii’s annexation to the U.S. was again opened. The previous president, Grover Cleveland, was a friend of Queen Liliuokalani. He had remained opposed to annexation until the end of his term, but McKinley was open to persuasion by U.S. expansionists and by annexationists from Hawaii. He agreed to meet with a committee of annexationists from Hawaii, Lorrin Thurston, Francis Hatch and William Kinney. After negotiations, in June of 1897, McKinley signed a treaty of annexation with these representatives of the Republic of Hawaii. The president then submitted the treaty to the U.S. Senate for approval.

Despite some opposition in the islands, the Newlands Resolution was passed by the House June 15, 1898, by a vote of 209 to 91, and by the Senate on July 6, 1898, by a vote of 42 to 21, formally annexing Hawaii as a U.S. territory in spite of opposition in the Congress (Schamel, Wynell and Charles E. Schamel, 1999). Although its legality was questioned by some because it was a resolution, not a treaty, both houses of Congress carried the measure with two-thirds majorities, whereas a treaty would have only required two-thirds of the Senate vote (Article II, Sec. 2, U.S. Constitution).

The overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii and the subsequent annexation of Hawaii are sometimes cited as examples of American imperialism.

In 1900, it was granted self-governance and retained Iolani Palace as the territorial capitol building. Though several attempts were made to achieve statehood, Hawaii remained a territory for sixty years. Plantation owners, like those who comprised the so-called Big Five, found territorial status convenient, enabling them to continue importing cheap foreign labor; such immigration was prohibited in various other states of the Union.

The power of the plantation owners was finally broken by activist descendants of original immigrant laborers. Because they were born in a U.S. territory, they were legal U.S. citizens. Expecting to gain full voting rights, they actively campaigned for statehood for the Hawaiian Islands.